5 Safety Tips for College Campuses

Crime is an unfortunate byproduct of our time. Everybody encounters it in some way, shape, or form. Though experiencing some form of crime is inevitable , there are helpful habits that you can adopt today to minimize your exposure to nefarious elements.

Avoid Walking Alone At Night

No matter how safe you think a city is you should strongly avoid walking alone after dark. Minimize your risk by staying in a group and using the buddy system. Have your friends escort you when possible (and do the same for them).

If however no one’s available then consider using your campus escort service for a safe ride home. In the case of University of Oregon the number is 541-346-2919.

Be Aware of Your Surroundings

Don’t walk around with headphones on or with your attention focused solely on your phone. By not paying attention to your surroundings you may find yourself the target to some unscrupulous characters or an inattentive driver.

Awareness also means being cognizant of your location Avoiding visiting areas you’re unfamiliar with at night and use a map app to know where you’re heading by day.

Keep Your Doors Locked

It doesn’t matter if it’s the door to your apartment, your car, or your dorm room – keep it locked! Thought it won’t always stop an intruder it will certainly make their job much more difficult.

Of course, all the locks in the world count for very little if you open them. Be conscientious of who you’re allowing into your apartment. If you don’t know them don’t let them in.

Save Your Campus Security Number

First and foremost, in case of an emergency the number you should dial is 911.

In non-emergency situations you can call your campus security office. If you’re a University of Oregon student the non-emergency number to save is 541-346-2919. If you’re on campus then dial 6-2919.

Know Where Campus Emergency Systems Are

University campuses utilize emergency help systems known as e-boxes/callboxes to request immediate assistance. Familiarize yourself with the locations of these systems and use them should a situation arise. For your convenience please find attached a map of Emergency Phone Locations.

 

If all else fails you can always try learning self defense. Be safe out there!

For some more safety tips visit our Essential Tips for Cyclists in Eugene page.

 

 

photo credit: Light in a dark alley. via photopin (license)

Five Fabulous Local Parks to Visit this Spring

Hendricks Park
Hendricks Park in Eugene Oregon. Source: wunderground.com

Sure, it may be cold and wet outside now but the blissful days of spring and summer will be here before you know it!  Next time we have a warm sunny day in the weather forecast, we recommend getting outdoors!  These five local parks are an ideal spot to soak up some Vitamin D and enjoy some much needed downtime.

#1 Hendricks Park

With 80 acres of stunning gardens and incredible views, Hendricks Park is a must for any nature lover. It’s the oldest park in Eugene and it’s never quite as noticeable (or incredible) as when you’re walking beneath the branches of 200-year old fir trees.  If you want a real treat make sure to visit in the spring when the flowers are in bloom.

In short, this park is ideal for anyone with an interest in hiking, bird watching, picnicking, or simply looking to relax in nature.

#2 Alton Baker Park

When we say Alton Baker is Eugene’s largest developed park, we mean it. At a whopping 373 acres there’s no shortage of space and facilities to take advantage of. Walking your dog, fishing, BMX, exercise stations, and disc golf are just a few of the options available to you at Alton Baker Park.

#3 Skinner’s Butte Park

If someone were asked to describe Skinner’s Butte in two words, they’d be “Rock Climbing.” The Columns of Skinner’s Butte offer a 50′ high rock wall that climbers can scale.

But don’t be fooled in thinking that’s all Skinner’s Butte has to offer. It’s also a pretty fantastic spot for a picnic or to ride your bike. You can even go ahead and grow your own vegetables in the community garden!

#4 Owen Rose Garden

Though the smallest park on the list at 8.5 acres, the Owen Rose Garden is no less spectacular. Named after George E. Owen who donated the parcels of land, the park has grown from an initial 750 roses to over 400 varieties displayed across 4,500 roses.

Though you can enjoy the sights of the park at your leisure, there is also the possibility of volunteering to lend a hand. The Owen Rose Garden organizes year-round Thursday work sessions where you can help manage these beautiful parks and get on some hands on experience in pruning, planting, and general rose care.

#5 Amazon Park

Though it might be easier to list the things you can’t do at Amazon Park, we’ll try to cover just a few of the activities available in the 99-acre park. There’s tennis courts, soccer fields, a skate-park, baseball diamonds, ball fields, a community garden, picnic tables, recreation centers, bike paths, a dog park, and exercise stations.

Perhaps most important of all, however, is the fact it contains Eugene’s only outdoor pool in its recreation facilities. When Summer comes around you’ll want to keep Amazon Park in mind.

10 Wellness Tips for Students

Exercise

Being a student is difficult enough without having to deal with illness and exhaustion.  In this cold season it’s more important than ever to take proper care of yourself.

1) Always Wash Your Hands

Make sure to wash your hands often, especially during cold and flu season. A simple cleaning can help minimize your exposure to disease.

2) Drink 2 Liters of Water a Day

Drinking enough water is the corner stone of living a healthy lifestyle. The current recommendation is that the average person should drink at least 2 liters of water a day, so make sure you bring a bottle with you when you head out to class.

3) Get 7-9 Hours Sleep

Too often a full night’s sleep is put aside in favor of homework, socializing, or browsing the internet. Aim to get 7-9 hours of sleep and you’ll immediately feel the effects in the morning. It goes without saying that you should avoid all nighters whenever possible, or you’ll be feeling like a zombie the next day.

4) Don’t Eat or Drink Right Before Bed

Eating and drinking (caffeine, alcohol) will affect your internal clock and leave you with a not-so-restful sleep.  Leave at least a few hours between meals and heading to bed.

5) Find Time to Exercise

Exercise doesn’t have to mean going to the gym to work out (although it’s great if you can). Walk or bike to class instead of driving to add some easy exercise to your life. You can also play a sport on the weekend with friends or through your school’s teams.

6) Eat Three Meals a Day

The benefits of eating three meals a day for your immune system and energy levels are huge. Always start the day with a good breakfast. If you don’t have time for a sit down lunch or dinner, bring a packed meal with you so you can have something to eat throughout the day.

7) If You’re Sick, Stay Home

We know there’s pressure to go to class even if you’re unwell, but the truth is you’re doing yourself and your classmates no favors by going to class sick. You’ll end up feeling worse and potentially pass the disease onto your colleagues.

8) Get a Flu Shot

A flu shot can be the very thing that prevents weeks of discomfort and illness. Check with the University Health Center on the U of O Campus.

9) Take A Break

Stress is a huge factor in fatigue and illness, so give yourself a break now and then! Take some time to see friends, play a video game, or read.

10) When In Doubt, See a Doctor

If you’re feeling unwell and your symptoms are not improving then no one can help quite as much as a doctor can. Your campus clinic or your personal doctor will be able to give you a checkup and suggest the necessary steps towards a full recovery.