Eight Benefits Available to U of O Students (You May Not Know About)

There’s no shortage to the excellent benefits and resources U of O has to offer its students: terrific career services department, state of the art facilities, an unparalleled staff, the Ducks (go Ducks!). Still, you may be unaware of some of these less obvious resources.

Zipcar Student Rates

Zipcar has partnered up with University of Oregon to provide affordable prices to the student population, allowing you to join for only $15. Head to our Zipcar post for more info!

LTD Rides for Free

That’s right, flash your student ID badge and you can ride any LTD bus for free. Click here for info regarding their routes and time tables.

Discounted Rates for Enterprise Car Share

Not only is the one-time $20 fee waived if you’re a student, your annual membership is a discounted $35! Visit Enterprise’s Car Share page for a map of available cars and pick up locations.

10% off Whole Foods Purchase

Did you know that as a student you can save 10% of your entire purchase every Tuesday throughout the academic year at Whole Foods? Not a deal to miss!

Deals on Mattresses from American Mattress Manufacturing

A new mattress can be a costly endeavor; American Mattress Manufacturing helps by offering discounts on mattresses and full sets.

Save Money on Software and Hardware

Most major software and tech companies—Adobe, Apple, Autocad, Microsoft—will offer student discounts on software and hardware; in some cases even allow students to use software for free.

Expand Your Mind Without Paying A Cent

Both the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Museum of Natural & Cultural History are free to students! Just bring your student ID with you and you’re good to go!

Get Your Swing on for Less

Like others on this list, Laurelwood Golf Course offers discounted rates to University of Oregon students!

Who knew a student ID could save you so much money? Be sure to follow our blog for the latest in tips and hacks for student living in Eugene!

Winter Health Tips

UoEd

Winter’s a few weeks away and that can only mean one thing; no, not the holidays, we’re unfortunately speaking winter illnesses. If you’re not careful you may find yourself on the receiving end of an unwanted “gift.”

Of course, there are things you can do to protect yourself this winter to ensure that nothing stands in your way this holiday season. These tips are good ones to adopt throughout the year but even more so in winter.

Avoid close contact with anyone who is sick.

The easiest way to not get infected is to limit your exposure to disease. It may seem a bit callous but two sick people are not better than one.

Don’t share food or drink with anyone.

As with the previous tip, the name of the game is limiting your exposure to viruses and bacteria.

Get plenty of sleep.

Aim to get at least 7-8 hours of sleep a night.

Eat a well balanced diet.

A balanced diet should include a foods rich in carbohydrates and low in salts and sugar, as well as fruits and vegetables, fish, and plenty of fluids.

Take vitamin D.

With overcast skies and grey days, it’s easy to become a bit lethargic in the absence of sunlight. Vitamin D will help give you the extra boost you may be lacking in the sun’s absence.

Stay active and exercise.

It’s amazing what a little exercise will do, especially if you’re trying to work off an abundant holiday feast or two. Get your moving a little bit every day.

Get your shots.

Make sure you are up to date with your flu shots! University of Oregon often offers special days to get your flu shot. If you’ve missed it then your local doctor will be happy to provide one.

Wash your hands

Remember throughout the day with soap and hot water. If you are away from a sink then hand sanitizer will do.

If despite all these tips you find yourself feeling sick, be sure to stay home! There’s no need to pass your disease along to others. If your symptoms worsen be sure to consult with your doctor! There’s no need to spend the holiday season stuck in bed, after all!

photo credit: uoeducation 2013 09 26 COE orientation 679 via photopin (license)

Give it the Old College Try With These Back-to-School Tips

Photo Source - Scholar Advisor

Yeah, we know; heading back to college after summer break can be tough. You’re probably still enjoying your time off and avoiding thinking about classes and registration, right?

The truth is, it’s better to be prepared and to start thinking about it now rather than be blindsided later on. So whether you’re a returning student or a brand new enrollee, consider these Back-To-School tips to make your life easier down the road!

1. Registration and Paperwork are done, right?

This is a biggie so we’ll go ahead and make it number one. Be sure to fill out all necessary paperwork for your classes, meal plan, parking permits, and any other steps required to be a functioning student. There won’t be much of a back-to-school if you aren’t enrolled in any classes, after all.

2. Establish Healthy Habits

These are helpful to stick to all year round, but doubly so when heading back to class after a long break. Make sure to get 7-9 hours of sleep a day and drink plenty of water. Try to get exercise when you can and rest when you’re sick. Stick with these tips and you’ll be in good shape.

Roommates

3. Get to know your roomie

You two are going to be living together for a while! Get to know one another, establish rules for cohabitation, and treat each other with mutual respect. You’ll have enough on your mind without having to worry about roommate troubles.

4. Be Safe

We could devote a whole post just to this (and we have) but the important thing to take away is to always be aware of your surroundings and careful when traveling at night. The buddy system is your friend!

5. Warm Up Your Brain Before College

Heading back to class, you’ll be expected to do a lot of critical thinking, assignments, and test taking. Like any good muscle, you should warm up your brain before putting it to work. Lead up to your term start by engaging in some brain activities, such as sudoku or crossword puzzles.

Stick to these tips and you’ll be ready to face anything your classes have in store for you!

Even the Score with UO $CORE

UO$CORE

 

How much do you spend on electricity a month? What about water? Is it higher than you’d like to be spending? What if we told you that you could be helped with your bills and do your part to help the greater good in the process? That’s exactly the case with UO $CORE, a student run program to help students save money on their utility bills for environmentally-responsible practices.

$CORE stands for “Student and Community Outreach for Renter efficiency” and was started in 2012 by James Walton, a senior business major who secured a grant from Eugene Water and Electric Board to create the program. Through $CORE, student staff perform free audits and install upgrades in older, off-campus student rental housing while also helping student tenants by providing information, materials, and skills to help lower their carbon footprint and utility bills.

If you’re interested in hearing more about how $CORE can help you save money then you should register for a free energy assessment!

Energy Assessment

What does this assessment include? Simply put, two Energy Evaluators will come to your house and assess your energy needs. Over the course of an hour they will install low use devices such as CFL lightbulbs and weather stripping, while also give you some information on how to lower your energy consumption and carbon footprint.

Not only will your bills be lower and your house better for the environment, you’ll even get a free pizza from TrackTown Pizza if more than half the household is present!

CFLBulbs
Say hello to your new best friend.

Tips for Reducing Energy Use

$CORE’s Facebook page is constantly updated with handy tips to reduce your utility bills and carbon footprint. We’ve selected a few here to share.

  • Wrap your water tank with jacket insulation to save up to 10% on water heating costs.
  • Install low-flow showerheads.
  • When cooking on a stovetop, match the pan size to the heating surface to prevent heat loss to the surrounding air.
  • Put your computer and monitor to sleep mode (or off) when you’re not using them.
  • Replace your bulbs with Energy Star® efficient light bulbs.
  • Keep your freezer full to minimize energy used. For maximum savings fill the freezer with gallons of water.

A quick session with UO $CORE and you’ll have lower bills, a diminished carbon footprint, and free pizza!!! That’s what we call a win-win!

photo credit: CFL bulbs via photopin (license)

Zipcar Around Eugene

Zipcar_Logo.svg

As much as we love biking (and we really, really love biking), there are certain times when you simply need a car. The problem is, if you’re not a car owner this can often amount to the awkward begging of friends for a ride.

Well, say goodbye to unnecessary groveling, because Zipcar is providing students with an affordable way to get around Eugene! Zipcar has partnered up with University of Oregon to provide affordable prices to the student population, allowing you to join for only $15.

Oh, and did we mention gas and insurance are included? Sounds pretty good, doesn’t it?

How does Zipcar work?

  1. Join Zipcar

Once you’ve successfully joined, you’ll receive your Zipcard, the key (both figurative and literal) to unlocking cars, vans, and trucks the country over.

  1. Reserve a Car

Reserving is incredibly simple and can be done either online or on your phone.

  1. Tap your Card

Approach your Zipcar and hold your zipcard to the windshield, thus unlocking the car!

  1. Drive

With that done, you now are free to drive around! When your time is up just return your car to the same reserved parking spot.

Where to Pickup your Zipcar

Zipcar has several accessible locations around campus! Below are the locations you can pick up/drop off your vehicle.

Zipcar LocationsIf you’re planning on moving out (or moving in) in the near future, Zipcar is an excellent option to help lessen your burden come moving day. After all, those boxes aren’t going to carry themselves across town!

A you can see, Zipcar is a simple, affordable, and convenient option to travel around Eugene and beyond. So the next time you’re looking to make a trip to Portland, consider trying a Zipcar!

Decorating Your Rental on a Budget – Part Two

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So you found an apartment and now you want to make it feel more like a home without spending a fortune. We know that decorating can be a challenge when your options are limited by rental rules.

Apartment Curtains

Make your windows a work of art. There are numerous ways to creatively dress up your windows without it costing a fortune.

  • Before you begin, measure your windows (starting from where you will install the curtain rod). This will help you determine how much fabric you will need (consult with a local fabric store to help you determine how much fabric you will need for this project)
  • Look for a basic medium-weight fabric such as cotton or a cotton-linen blend so it is easy to work with. Bright colors or patterns will give a refreshing contrast to the monotone white walls in your apartment.
  • To make your ceilings seem taller, hang the curtains 6-10 inches above the window.
  • Consult with a DYI website to get easy sewing tips on simple curtains. If you don’t sew, you can always use an adhesive fabric tape.
  • Hang your homemade curtains with inexpensive clip rings which can be purchased at most hardware stores or any Target or Walmart.
  • If you want an even easier window treatment, you can of course purchase inexpensive pre-made curtains at most stores. Fabric shower-curtains are another option, and are easy to install. You can even make a window valance using a scarf or a tablecloth.

Decide on your color scheme and stick...Blending colors that contrast with white walls will make the space feel more open. Cool colors like green, turquoise, blue, and purple can make a room feel more spacious and elegant. Warm colors like orange, yellow, and red can make the space appear cozy and intimate.

 

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photo credit: June:22 via photopin (license)

Handy Info For New Von Klein Property Management Tenants!

Larry & Carmon von Klein
Larry & Carmon von Klein have owned and operated Von Klein Property Management for 25+ years!

It’s the beginning of a new school year and September is going to a very busy month for the Von Klein staff- “Move In Days” are finally here!  We are here to help all of our residents have a smooth move in process so read through these tips and bookmark this post, you never know when this info will come in handy:

  • If your move in date and lease signing date are the same, your security deposit is due with your first month’s rent. Please note that you will not receive keys until you have a zero balance.
  • If you are moving in this month, your security deposit was due on August 1st. This policy is in place because it ensures that you have a zero balance on your account and causes less confusion at move in time.
  • To get a parking space you must come to our office (or see your onsite manager, if applicable) for a parking permit when we post a notice on your door for your complex that they are ready. Please bring your driver’s license and registration- and not your insurance. The car must be registered under your name or under your parents name. Each unit comes with ONE parking spot at no extra cost to you. If you lose or misplace your first parking permit, you may purchase a second parking permit for $5.00.
  • Plug the following numbers into your phone (if applicable)
    von Klein office – 541-485-7776
    von Klein Emergency – 541- 686-0743
    EWEB Electric Company – 541-484-6016
    Northwest Natural Gas – 541-351-3661
    Century Link Phone Company – 1-800-244-1111
    Comcast Cable Company – 541-484-3000
    University Police Station – 541-682-8350
    Diamond Parking – 541-343-3733
    UO Conflict Resolution Services: 541-346-0617
    Community Mediation Services 541-344-5366
    ASUO Legal Services 541-346-4273

Bookmark these University of Oregon Resources (in case you ever need them)

City of Eugene

  • City of Eugene
    Information about the City of Eugene including services and city events.
  • Eugene Police Department
    Safety and police enforcement information for students and community members.

City of Eugene Parking

Download these Off-Campus Resources

If you need any assistance, we are here to help!  Please contact our office during business hours at (541) 485-7776. Our office is located at 1301 Ferry St., Eugene, OR 97401. We are here to help you! Happy move in!

Decorating Your Rental Property on a Budget (Part One)

Apartment Decorating

Ever wonder how you can personalize your apartment without spending a fortune or ruining your chances to get your deposit back?

Lots of our tenants have!  That’s why we have put together a list of simple decorating tips to help you make your apartment feel more like home.  Whether your taste is traditional, eclectic, minimalist or kitschy it is possible to create a desirable living space on without spending a fortune when you use a little bit of
creativity. Here are some ideas on how to decorate your rental property on a budget.

Bring in area rugs to add more color. If you are decorating on a budget, an area rug  is a big purchase. Look for bargains online and at discount stores like IKEA, thrift stores or resale sites like Ebay or CraigsList. Once you find the right rug that fits in with your color scheme, place the rug in the middle of the room to frame your space.

Brighten up standard walls and ceiling lights with DIY artwork ideas!

  • Add soft lighting throughout the apartment with inexpensive lamps with lamp shades rimmed with ribbon for a personalized designer look.
  • Tack a scarf or square of neat fabric to the ceiling over a drab boring light fixture. The fabric hangs far enough down that it won’t heat up or scorch, and the pretty colored light shines through below.
  • Staple fabric over a bulletin board. Hang on the wall and pin your favorite pictures on it.

Choose light and functional furniture (if possible). Chances are, you probably do not have a budget to buy all new furniture. For many of us apartment dwellers, our furniture chooses us when we inherit pieces from our family members. Despite popular belief, you don’t need as much furniture as you think.

  • Remember- what you move in, you will eventually need to move out. So go light and stick with the essential pieces- a few living room pieces for seating and storage, a dining room table, a bed and a dresser is really all you need to get started.
  • You can find great deals on used furniture at thrift stores or resale sites like CraigsList.
  • If you get a thrift store sofa, consider covering it with an inexpensive slip cover in a soft or muted color that blends with your accent colors.
  • Repurposing furniture from a thrift store is also great way to go green.
  • If you must buy new furniture, find some that you can assemble yourself (IKEA is a great place to find this). This will make moving in and moving out easier.
  • Make your own throw pillows in the same color scheme as your curtains to pull together the look in your living room and bedroom.
  • Go to the local discount store or dollar store for more basic items like kitchen utensils, trash cans and more.

Going Somewhere for Winter Break? Follow These Safety Tips

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Reposted from The Pond & Beyond

The holiday break brings relaxation from the day-to-day demands of college life and for many, an opportunity to leave the area to enjoy time with family and friends. However, students are not the only ones who look forward to this time of year!

Here are some tips to keep your things safe while you’re away.
These simple and effective tips to protect your property can make the difference between coming home relaxed and ready to take on the new challenges of winter term and becoming a statistic for future students to learn from.

BURGLARY PREVENTION

Lock doors and windows
Take valuables like small electronics with you
Cose your blinds and leave a radio or TV and a light on

THEFT FROM VEHICLE PREVENTION

Don’t leave ANYTHING in your vehicle
Lock all doors and windows
Park in well-lit areas

THEFT OF VEHICLE PREVENTION

Use a steering wheel locking device
Use a vehicle security system that disables the ignition

Not Leaving for the Break?
For those who will be in the area for winter break, help protector your neighbor’s stuff by reporting suspicious activity to the Eugene Police non-emergency number at 541-682-5111!

Be sure to click here to download our Winter Break Safety Tips!

photo credit: UC Irvine via photopin cc

Dos and Don’ts of Being a Good Neighbor in Your Apartment Community

Photo Source: Apartment Life on Facebook

It doesn’t matter if you are a first-time renter or an experienced one, one of best pieces of advice we can give to our tenants is to be considerate of your neighbors (you know- the people who live upstairs, downstairs, next door, 3 doors down, etc).

Living with multiple neighbors is a big adjustment for those new to apartment living, but it is a good policy to be on good terms with all or most residents in your apartment community. Think of it like an insurance policy. The peace of mind that comes with knowing you are surrounded by people who are there for you is priceless.

A strong network of neighbors will help make your property more secure if they are actively watching out for each other while away. Neighbors are great for watering the plants, checking the mail, removing flyers or packages left at the door that could otherwise alert potential burglars that you are away.

Good neighbors can come to the rescue when you are in a bind whether it’s something small like lending you an iron, or cup of milk for a recipe; or something major like providing assistance in the the unfortunate case of an emergency.

The stress and tension that results from bad neighbors can create a miserable apartment living experience. Nobody enjoys receiving dirty looks, snide comments, or enduring other passive aggressive and immature behavior (like blasting loud music intentionally).

To avoid this, here are some tips to help you build positive relationships with other tenants.

DO

  • Make a good first impression by introducing yourself…i.e. “Hi, I’m Becky I live just down the hall from you”.

  • Ask some basic questions, learn a little about them and share a little about yourself.

  • Acknowledge your neighbor with a smile and a quick “hello” when passing by.

  • Let your neighbor(s) know you are there should they every need help with something

  • Exchange contact information (if you are comfortable doing so).

  • Make an effort to be polite and respectful.

  • Show common courtesy.

  • Repay a neighbor who does you a favor with a small thank-you gift or note. Let them know you appreciate their favor.

  • Be willing to return the favor to a neighbor who helps you.

  • Be tolerant. Try not to take your neighbor’s actions or comments personally. Chances are they were not directed to you.

  • Watch your noise levels. You are probably being too loud if neighbors can hear your conversation or music inside their homes.

  • Clean up after a party, including debris left around property.

  • Ask for assistance when you need it; many neighbors are willing to lend a hammer or an ear.

  • Calmly and politely discuss concerns with your neighbors as soon as they arise and before they escalate into larger issues.

  • Return all borrowed items quickly and with gratitude (include a thank you note or a small gift is a nice touch).

 

DON’T

  • Feel like you have to be a social butterfly (in fact, being too friendly can come across as being a busybody, which will turn some people off).

  • Blow them off when when they say “hello” or wish you a good day.

  • Host a large party without inviting or at least talking to your neighbors.

  • Drop by every day unannounced. Having a good neighbor in your building can be great, but it doesn’t mean you have to be best friends. Unless they really are your best friend, use good judgment and respect their space and privacy.

  • Park in your neighbor’s parking space.

  • Allow your friends or visitors to park in your neighbor’s parking space.

  • Park on the sidewalk or on grass or other landscaping.

  • Assume they won’t have a problem with your loud music or conversations.

If you are having a difficulty resolving a conflict with a neighbor, Conflict Resolution Services can help open a discussion between you and your neighbors with the hope of furthering understanding and finding resolution. Conflict Resolution Services Go to studentlife.uoregon.edu and click on “Conflict Resolution Services.” 541-346-6105 or -0617