Handy Info For New Von Klein Property Management Tenants!

Larry & Carmon von Klein
Larry & Carmon von Klein have owned and operated Von Klein Property Management for 25+ years!

It’s the beginning of a new school year and September is going to a very busy month for the Von Klein staff- “Move In Days” are finally here!  We are here to help all of our residents have a smooth move in process so read through these tips and bookmark this post, you never know when this info will come in handy:

  • If your move in date and lease signing date are the same, your security deposit is due with your first month’s rent. Please note that you will not receive keys until you have a zero balance.
  • If you are moving in this month, your security deposit was due on August 1st. This policy is in place because it ensures that you have a zero balance on your account and causes less confusion at move in time.
  • To get a parking space you must come to our office (or see your onsite manager, if applicable) for a parking permit when we post a notice on your door for your complex that they are ready. Please bring your driver’s license and registration- and not your insurance. The car must be registered under your name or under your parents name. Each unit comes with ONE parking spot at no extra cost to you. If you lose or misplace your first parking permit, you may purchase a second parking permit for $5.00.
  • Plug the following numbers into your phone (if applicable)
    von Klein office – 541-485-7776
    von Klein Emergency – 541- 686-0743
    EWEB Electric Company – 541-484-6016
    Northwest Natural Gas – 541-351-3661
    Century Link Phone Company – 1-800-244-1111
    Comcast Cable Company – 541-484-3000
    University Police Station – 541-682-8350
    Diamond Parking – 541-343-3733
    UO Conflict Resolution Services: 541-346-0617
    Community Mediation Services 541-344-5366
    ASUO Legal Services 541-346-4273

Bookmark these University of Oregon Resources (in case you ever need them)

City of Eugene

  • City of Eugene
    Information about the City of Eugene including services and city events.
  • Eugene Police Department
    Safety and police enforcement information for students and community members.

City of Eugene Parking

Download these Off-Campus Resources

If you need any assistance, we are here to help!  Please contact our office during business hours at (541) 485-7776. Our office is located at 1301 Ferry St., Eugene, OR 97401. We are here to help you! Happy move in!

Money Management Tips For Students Part Two

Money Management
Basic money management skills are essential for students to master in order to be successful during their college years and throughout life. Last month, we shared some budgeting and spending tips for students to follow to help them get a handle on their finances. Here’s a follow up post with more tips to help you get a handle on finances-

Know your Credit Score

Bad credit will haunt you for years to come and limit your options in the future as far as housing, transportation, continuing education and more. To secure a better future and access to lower interest rates, you must maintain a good, clean credit report. Sites like AnnualCreditReport.com will give you one free credit report per year online. You can also check with Consumer Credit Reporting Companies like Experian, Equifax and TransUnion.

With identity theft and other cyber crimes on the rise, knowing your credit score can also help you stay ahead of potential consumer fraud. The Federal Trade Commission is a great resource to help protect yourself and your financial future.

Pay with Cash

Having trouble staying true to your budget? Always pay with cash- and you won’t have a choice. “Withdraw however much cash you plan to spend that week, and don’t use your debit card,” says blogger Jordin Keim in this article. “It’s harder to watch cash go than it is to swipe a card, so you will think twice before making unnecessary purchases.”

Set Aside Emergency Funds

Count on this- you will encounter unanticipated expenses as a student and throughout life. It’s guaranteed. So, be smart and plan for these emergencies. Follow this simple rule and it will set you free from the burden of these unwelcome “surprises”: Live below your means and set aside cash each month for emergency funds. Always have a cushion to get you through times of need.

Utilize Technology to Manage Your Budget

One of the advantages of living in the digital age is the ability to manage your cash on the go. Much of the work can be done right from your phone thanks to banks and their online money management resources like bill pay, budget monitoring, savings account management and more. Free apps like Balance and Mint are very helpful to busy students.

For more tips and ways students can manage their money and get ahead, visit these sites:

Get Rich Slowly – Personal Finance That Makes Cents
CNN Money – Personal Finance

photo credit: 223/365 – my bank sucks via photopin (license)

How to Find the Right Roommate for You

Happy Roomates

Now that we are renting properties for the 2015-2016 school year, it’s time to find your roommate if you have not already done so. While this process can be fun and exciting, it’s important to do your homework and find the right person. Trust us, you don’t want to be stuck in a lease with someone who you have nothing in common with.

Whether you plan to live with a friend or a friend of a friend or a stranger- you must find out important details about their personality, habits and lifestyle preferences before making a decision.

Tip #1-Set up an interview.

Even if you are moving in with someone you know, set aside time to have an honest discussion to find out of this is a good fit. Be honest about your expectations and make sure they match those of your potential roommate. Don’t tiptoe around the subject in order to seem polite, be upfront.

Tip #2- Ask questions before signing the lease.

Talk about your likes/dislikes, cleaning habits, friends, significant others, sleeping habits, etc. Establishing an open line of communication from the beginning will save you from potential misery down the line. Here are some basic ones you’ll want to cover-

1. Are they an early riser or a night owl? Light sleeper or good sleeper?

2. What is their typical work or school schedule? Will it conflict with yours?

3. What do they need to feel safe and secure (locking windows, etc)?

4. Are they neat or “relaxed?? Get clarification as this means different things to different people (and no one admits to being a slob).

5. What are their favorite/least favorite chores? How to do they like to divide up household work (chore list, just do it when they feel like it, etc.).

6. Are they extra-sensitive to fragrances and/or odors? This may affect what you choose as cleaning products and you may have to hide your running shoes after going to the gym.

7. Are they allergic to anything? (Examples: peanuts, perfume, milk, flowers, mold, smoke).

8. Do they smoke, drink, or do any other kinds of recreational drugs?

9. Do they enjoy talking or do they prefer to be quiet all the time? Do they talk about feelings or keep to themselves?

10. Do they enjoy decorating, or do they not care about decorating? What decorating style do they have?

11. What kind of music do they listen to and, more importantly, do they particularly enjoy listening to it when it’s loud?

12. How much TV do they watch? What do they watch? Are they fans of a sport team that you do not support or a sport you do not like

13. Do they like to share some items like pots and dishes or do they prefer to have separate everything?

14. How often do they invite friends and romantic interests over? Are you comfortable with the crowd they hang out with?

Source How to Find a Good Roommate on WikiHow

Tip #3-Listen to your gut instinct.

Your instincts are usually right on. If you get a weird feeling about a potential roommate, tell them politely that you don’t think it would be a good match and move on.

The University of Oregon Office of Dean of Students has additional resources for Off Campus living in addition to a list of places to search or advertise to find a new roomate. You can always contact our office at (541) 485-7776 for more questions, we are always willing to help in any way we can.

photo credit: Fun Ladies via photopin (license)

Essential Money Management Tips for Students

Money Management Tips College

Adjusting to college life is filled with obstacles, but basic financial management is one of the biggest challenges students must overcome to be successful not just in college, but in life. Unless you are living on trust fund, the costs of student life can be overwhelming. However, adopting simple money management habits like smart budgeting and spending can make all the difference in the world.

In order to form a strong foundation for money management, there are two essential steps students need to master:

#1- Know where your money is going.
#2- Create and follow a realistic budget.

Mastering these two steps will take time and patience. But the payoff in the long run is freedom from financial stress, dept and the means to provide for yourself and others.

#1 Know Where Your Money is Going

If you don’t already do this, get into the habit TODAY of keeping a spending log. Knowing where your money is going will allow to to take control of your finances and give you the ability to buy the things you really want in the future. A spending log is a very simple but powerful tool to get started. Click here to learn more and to download a spending log you can begin using today.

#2 Create and follow a realistic budget

Following a budget will ensure that you have enough to provide what you need and allow you to reach goals like saving enough money for Spring Break, buying a new bike etc. For this to be successful, it may take months of practice and patience and a willingness to make sacrifices.

To create a budget you can actually follow, review your spending log to see where your money is currently going and where you can cut back. To do this, you must determine between what you need (food, clothing, rent, gas, textbooks) and what you want (the other stuff). Here’s a great tip from the article, 10 budget tips for college students.

You must learn to balance between needs and wants. Your needs will always come first, and your wants second. You have to live within your means, so if your wants exceed your needs, you must either get another job, or sacrifice those wants. It’s a tough thing, but you can do it! It’s only for a little while. List monthly income sources, including savings, wages and parental allowances, and then write down estimated expenses for the month. It isn’t easy to identify college living expenses in advance, but you should try. Take costs such as school supplies, food outside your meal plan, personal care items and laundry into account. Then, try managing your budget and tracking expenses using an online personal finance management tool like Mint.com, which helps you easily create and stick to a budget.

Resources

Click here for a simple budget worksheet to help get you started. You can also learn more about personal budgeting, visit StudentAid.gov/Budget.

We recommend The Live Like a Duck program for students. This money management program provides tools and tips to help students and their families make sound financial decisions while you attend the UO.

photo credit: $23 lunch/beer/dessert 2009-11-02 12.05.49 via photopin (license)

Five Tips to Get Through Finals Week

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It’s hard to believe, but finals week is here! Final exams can be a stressful time for students, especially if you are juggling a job, an apartment and multiple activities. We wish all of our tenants good luck on finals or any exam you may be taking right now. Here are some tips to help you do your best!

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1) Optimize and organize your study space

A well organized study room is very essential during this time. Make sure that you have enough space to organize your textbooks & notes, your chair & study table are comfortable and that the lighting in the room is good. be sure to remove any potential distractions like your phone, tablets (unless it’s needed to study), game systems, TV and anything else that would cause you to lose focus. If music is a distraction, replace it with white noise to minimize interruptions to your study time.

2) Eat right and exercise

It is CRITICAL to take care of your body during exam time, yet so many students neglect their health during this time. Stick to the basics: a balanced diet that includes vegetables & fruits, avoid sugar and go for healthy snacks (e.g. yoghurt, almonds, fruits) to keep your blood sugar stable. If you are going to study for a long time, eat some protein. On the day of the exams, do not forget to eat breakfast! Research has shown that high-carb, high-fiber, slow-digesting foods such as oatmeal are the best for exam day. Also, remember to drink plenty of water (at least 8 glasses a day) to keep your body hydrated. Exercise is also essential during this time as it helps you refresh your mind.

3) Manage your time wisely

It’s very common for students to wait until the last minute to “cram”, but according to experts, this is not advisable. Write down a list all the exams that you are preparing for, and then set a study timetable. Note that, there are some subjects that may require more study time than others however, you should never neglect any of them. Smart time management will also help you avoid cramming which lowers your ability to retain information.

4) Take regular breaks

Research shown that regular breaks are very essential for long term retention of knowledge. Not all the people are the same and therefore make sure that you develop a study routine that works for you. When you feel tired, take a short break to stretch and at least have your mind rest for a while before resuming your studies.

5) Look at the past exams

If possible, reviewing old exams will help you understand the format of the questions and train your brain to perform better on exam day. You can also time yourself to ensure that you spend the right amount of time on each section.

We hope these tips help you get through finals week successfully! On the day of the exam, make sure that you have everything that you will need ready (e.g. writing materials etc). Also get the directions of the room/place where the exam is going to take place and do not forget to look at the rules and regulations. Good luck!

photo credit: CollegeDegrees360 via photopin cc

photo credit: JuditK via photopin cc

Duck Spotlight: CommUniversity Assistant Program

The CommUniversity Assistant Program (CAP).
Photo Source: The CommUniversity Assistant Program (CAP) on Facebook.

Living off campus can be an exciting and rewarding time for students where they can experience independence and personal freedom.

But for some students, that increased freedom can come at a cost. It’s confusing and stressful for inexperienced first time renters to learn the ropes, navigate their way through issues with other roommates, neighbors and addressing safety concerns. It’s often hard to know who students can turn to, which is one of the primary reasons why the University of Oregon Office of the Dean of Students launched The CommUniversity Assistant Program (CAP).

CommUniversity Assistants are student leaders (CAPs) hired by the University to live in student-populated neighborhoods and serve as liaisons between students and the greater community. These students know first hand the issues students face and work to create positive off-campus student living where students can study, have fun and thrive.

The organization works to educate students on their rights and responsibilities and the impact of student behavior on residents, business owners, and property owners. They also provide resources to students with scheduled programs throughout the year like the Off-Campus Housing Fair, Move-Out Event, Taking it to the Streets, and Winter Family Weekend. Think of them as the “What To Do and Where To Go” People.

The Goals of CAPs are to:
• To foster positive relationships between edge neighborhoods (residents, business owners, and property owners) and the University (students and employees). Provide value to the University and the community in this relationship.

• To improve quality of life for students who reside off-campus, to advance student learning.

• To increase access to campus and community resources for students who reside off-campus.

To learn more about this program and how it can benefit you, contact the CommUniversity Assistant Program through one of the following channels:

Telephone: 541-346-3216
E-mail: communiversity@uoregon.edu
Facebook: www.facebook.com/UOCommUniversity
Twitter: www.twitter.com/comm_university
Office of the Dean of Students
164 Oregon Hall

Links and Additional Resources:
dailyemerald.com
www.facebook.com/UOCommUniversity

City of Eugene and UO leaders to go door to door in campus neighborhoods

Photo Source: "Around the O" University of Oregon
Photo Source: “Around the O” University of Oregon

Leaders will welcome students, share information on unruly gathering ordinance

To celebrate the start of the academic year and to welcome back University of Oregon students to Eugene, university and City officials will visit residents door to door from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 30.

Started in 2009, the Community Welcome event is an opportunity to create neighborhood relationships and to provide information about respectful and safe off-campus living experiences.

City of Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy and others will walk door to door to greet off campus students on Tuesday September 30th
City of Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy will join Interim President Scott Coltrane and other campus and city leaders to walk door to door to greet off campus students on Tuesday September 30th
Scott Coltrane Interim President
Scott Coltrane Interim President

“The Community Welcome is a great way for us to connect with our students and campus neighbors,” said interim President Scott Coltrane. “We are a community that benefits from each other and looks out for one another. We want our students who live off-campus to know how to stay safe, be respected and respectful, and be to good neighbors. This face to face interaction really helps us build these relationships.”

Approximately 100 people in small groups will distribute approximately 2,000 “Your Neighbors and U” brochures during the evening event that will cover more than 70 city blocks. In addition, neighbors and rental property managers have already started distributing the information to tenants. The booklet contains information that encourages students to meet their neighbors, keep themselves and their belongings safe, know local laws, use sustainable transportation options, and party responsibly. The publication includes information on municipal ordinance on unruly gatherings that holds hosts criminally responsible for unruly gatherings where alcohol is present and at least two illegal activities are taking place.

“The University of Oregon and its programs, faculty, staff and students make considerable contributions to our community in so many ways,” said Mayor Kitty Piercy. “I enjoy this collaborative effort to welcome the students each year and let them know how much we value them. It’s also important to help them understand the importance of getting to know their neighbors and being responsible members of the community.”

Mayor Piercy and Interim President Coltrane will be joined by Associated Student of the University of Oregon (ASUO) President Beatriz Gutierrez; City Manager Jon Ruiz; Eugene Police Department Chief Pete Kerns; UO Police Department Chief Carolyn McDermed; UO Dean of Students Paul Shang; and neighborhood association leaders.

 

 

Twelve Things to Do for Free (or really Cheap) in Eugene, Oregon

Photo Source: Eugene Saturday Market via Facebook
Photo Source: Eugene Saturday Market via Facebook

One of the biggest challenges of college life is managing your finances. Between college tuition and living expenses, most of you are probably on a tight budget.

Fortunately, you don’t need a lot of money to take advantage of all that Eugene Oregon has to offer; it’s is a vibrant, friendly, community oriented city full of cheap and free things to do!

Though there are probably too many to list, here are twelve recommendations to get your started. With your student ID, many of these activities are either free or discounted.

1. Check out a Zepplin, Beatles, U2, or Pink Floyd Laser show at the Science Factory Children’s Museum & Planetarium (November-December). Click here for info.

2. Find unique treasures at local Saturday morning garage sales (various locations around town) and Eugene Saturday Market: Oak Street and East 8th through mid-November. Saturday Market features hundreds of local crafts artisans, great food, live music, and a fabulous Farmers Market!

3. Take a hike up Spencer Butte.

4. Take in 15,000 years of human history and 200 million years of geology at The U of O Museum of Natural History, the largest natural history museum between Seattle and San Francisco and a center for archaeological and paleontological research in the Pacific Northwest and the wider world.

5. Take a visit to Pre’s Rock, the site where Olympian Steve Prefontaine died at 24 when his convertible crashed into the ledge. Pre’s Rock is now a shrine memorializing the legendary distance runner. Click here for directions and info.

6. Catch a movie at the Bijou Art Cinemas (next to our office) which has provided the finest Foreign, Indie and Classic Films to Eugene for over 30 yrs. David Minor Theater, Eugene’s first & best downtown movie theater/pub, is also a fun place to catch a flick. For super cheap movie tickets, check out Discount Day on Wednesdays at Cinemark Movies 12 in Springfield.

7. Unwind at Alton Baker Park. Run, bike, walk, or roller blade along the riverfront bike path and pedestrian bridge, bring a picnic and your favorite book, and enjoy the relaxing views of the river and ducks.

8. Spend an afternoon at The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA), a premier Pacific Northwest visual arts center for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art. Check out their vast collection of Asian artifacts & Pacific Northwest Art.

9. Go Ice Skating at The Rink Exchange $5 admission with student ID. Located on the Lane County Fairgrounds, be sure to check their calendar or call in advance for Public Skating times.

10. Take in the many free art exhibits available at The Maude Kerns Art Center. Lane Arts Council’s First Friday ArtWalk is also a great way to explore local artists and galleries for FREE (always the first Friday of the month from 5:30-8pm ). Click here for details on the next

11. Pack a picnic lunch and spend a sunny afternoon strolling through the lush forest and world-renowned 12 acre rhododendron garden at Hendrick’s Park on Summit and Skyline Drive.

12. Visit Mount Pisgah Arboretum, featuring a 209 acre living tree museum, riverside trails, open wildflower meadows, fun educational events and more.

For More ideas, visit For more ideas, visit
www.uodos.uoregon.edu
Free and Cheap Things To Do in Eugene Oregon

Did you Know? 12 Interesting Facts about Eugene, Oregon

Eugene

If you are new to the Eugene, Oregon community, you will be happy to know that you are living in what we believe is one of the best places to be on earth!  We should know, the Von Klein family have been members of this community for decades.

University of Oregon DucksOur area is known as one of America’s most livable communities with easy access to arts and culture, numerous parks and gardens, culinary offerings and miles of running and bike trails.

So for all of you new to town, we want to welcome you by sharing some interesting facts you may not know about our “Emerald City”.

Did you know….

1. Eugene recently ranked in the Top 10 on the Livability.com 100 Best Places to Live list,ranked on the Best Places for Business and Careers -Forbes and we ranked 10th on the 2013 Allstate America’s Best Drivers Report™ just to name a few…

2. The University of Oregon, founded in 1876, is one of the oldest universities on the West Coast…

3. Eugene is the only U.S. city to host three consecutive U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Track & Field (1972, 1976, 1980). It’s also home of the 2008 and 2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Track & Field. In fact, Historic Hayward Field is one of the most famous track and field-only facilities in the world…..

4. Donald Duck, the mascot for the University of Oregon, is the ONLY sports mascot by Disney….

5. The “Civil War”, the U of O’s annual match up against Oregon State, is the seventh oldest rivalry in college football…

6. Eugene is home to some of our regions best breweries, while downtown Eugene hubs are infused with bottleshops, taphouses and growler fill stations. Well-known breweries include Ninkasi, Rogue and McMenamins…..

7. Eugene is named after its founder, Eugene Franklin Skinner. Until 1889, it was named Eugene City…..

8. Eugene’s slogan is “A Great City for the Arts and Outdoors”. It is also referred to as the “Emerald City”, and as “Track Town, USA”….

9. Springfield, Oregon is the real life inspiration for the Simpson’s hometown….

10. Eugene is the birthplace of Nike….

11. Oregon’s largest sports arena/stadium is the University of Oregon’s Autzen Stadium……

12. Eugene is consistently ranked as one of America’s “Most Bicycle Friendly Cities”….

Performing arts centers, galleries, music and cultural festivals, museums, as well as the dynamics of the University of Oregon’s intellectual and athletic inspiration keep the area thriving with vitality.  So, get out there and enjoy all that our community has to offer!

Story Source: www.eugenecascadescoast.org

photo credit: Erik R. Bishoff via photopin cc

photo credit: Don Hankins via photopin cc

The University of Oregon Ranks in Kiplinger’s Best Values in Public Colleges 2014 List

University of OregonWe take a great deal of pride serving University of Oregon students, who in our opinion are among the finest in the nation!

We were not surprised earlier this month when the university announced it has been rated as one of the 100 best values in public colleges and universities for 2014 by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine which takes into account each of the 621 public, four-year colleges and universities in the U.S.

Kiplinger’s bases its list on the combination of outstanding education and economic value. The magazine assesses quality through standards including admission rates, freshman-to-sophomore retention rates, student-to-faculty ratios and four-year graduation rates. Cost criteria include low sticker prices, abundant financial aid and low average debt at graduation. The annual public school rankings appear in Kiplinger’s February 2014 issue – on newsstands Dec. 31, and online now.

The University of Oregon, founded in 1876, is the state’s flagship institution. The university offers academic excellence and hands-on learning opportunities in a welcoming atmosphere. Towering trees shade the 295-acre campus, where students, faculty members, and employees from a wide variety of backgrounds share a commitment to preserving the environment and pursuing innovation in more than 260 academic programs that range from Eugene to Portland and from the coast to the mountains.

Don’t forget the Oregon Ducks will make their first-ever appearance in the Valero Alamo Bowl on Dec. 30th!! Go Ducks!

photo credit: Erik R. Bishoff via photopin cc